PROBLEM SOLVING IN WATERCOLOUR / by Glenn Dixon

This artwork compliments a fascinating filmmaking assignment I am currently working on with La Trobe University. The series explores La Trobe Universities' partnership with ReMSTEP, a national initiative to drive major improvement in the quality of science and mathematics pre-service teacher education.

My principal challenge is to create visuals to compliment a one-minute voice over that will introduce each film. The voice-over references online curriculum resources, providing context to the story. As these resources are static text documents, they do not lend themselves to becoming powerful visual overlays let alone the opening shots of a film.

My solution was to commission Ray Eckermann (Small Mountains) to re-imagine my films as large watercolour artworks. I sent Ray the rough cuts and he represented the key narrative points in his beautiful illustration style. I was able to film close up shots of the physical posters and integrate them throughout the film. This offered tremendous creative flexibility in the edit and the films are more powerful as a result.

Ray's ability to encapsulate the key messages in my films provided me with a deeper awareness of what my films are communicating. There was an instance when Ray’s draft came in and it did not match my vision. It soon became clear that my rough cut was not communicating our intent clearly enough and we revised the film accordingly.

This creative solution has offered additional surprising benefits; As these films will be used in classroom contexts in addition to their training purposes, educators can print the posters off and display in the classroom while they run these activities with students. It's a lovely tangible experience that connects the film to the classroom.

We are completing post-production tasks with the first five films in the series with another to film to shoot in May. I look forward to sharing and discussing the finished films when we are ready to publish them.


Gallery above:  Original watercolour prints by Ray Eckermann.
Photograph below: Early sketches with my notes in red.